Strategies for Better Data

Overview

Generating high quality data on thermal analyzers and rheometers requires an understanding of the instrument and specifications, available experimental techniques and design, proper sample preparation practices, and effective analysis and presentation of the information. TA Instruments is proud to offer training seminars focused on strategies for a systematic approach to getting the most accurate information from your instruments. Watch and learn how to sharpen your skills and avoid common errors.

Who Should Watch

These training seminars are designed for scientists, chemists, technicians, and managers with any level of familiarity with thermal analysis and/or rheology instrumentation. The information presented will be helpful for those who run equipment day-to-day, manage their use, or simply rely on thermal or rheological data. Users of all makes and models of instrument will benefit from the training.

Videos by Category

  • Part 1: Instrument Fundamentals and Sample Preparation
  • Part 2: Efficient and Effective Method Development
  • Part 3: Tips for Data Reduction and Presentation

Part 1: Instrument Fundamentals and Sample Preparation

IN THIS SESSION

The fundamental elements of understanding a thermal analysis instrument and reliably preparing a sample are developed.

  • Instrument Calibration: DSC, TGA, TMA
  • Understanding Instrument Performance Metrics and How They Relate to Sample Measurements: Specific examples from melting, glass transition, and decompositions
    • Baseline performance
    • Sensitivity
    • Precision, repeatability, and accuracy
  • Sample Preparation for Meaningful Results
    • Pan selection for DSC, TGA, and SDT
    • Sample preparation guidelines

Part 2: Efficient and Effective Method Development

IN THIS SESSION

Data are only meaningful if they are collected as part of a well-designed, well-understood experiment. This session will introduce and provide guidelines for the appropriate selection of experimental parameters and will help the viewer to understand what experiment types may be most informative for them.

  • Basic Method Development Guidelines
    • Temperature Range and Cycling
    • Heating and Cooling Rate
    • Purge Gas
  • Advanced Thermal Analysis Methods
    • Heat Capacity
    • Modulated DSC (MDSC™)
    • HiRes™ TGA
    • Reaction Kinetics by DSC and TGA, including MTGA™
    • Vapor Sorption
    • Evolved Gas Analysis by Mass Spectroscopy

Part 3: Tips for Data Reduction and Presentation

IN THIS SESSION

Once collected, high quality thermal analysis data leads to high quality conclusions through effective analysis, interpretation, and presentation.

  • Presentation
    • Proper Scaling for Normalized Sensitivity
    • Using Derivatives to Define Limits of Analysis
    • Effective use of Overlay Plots
  • Interpretation: Correlation to Structure-Property Relationships
    • Thermal Stability
    • Thermoset Structure Development
    • The Glass Transition
    • Amorphous Aging
    • Crystallinity
  • Avoid Misinterpretation of Artifacts and Unexpected Events
  • Additional Software and Training Resources

 

  • Part 1: Instrument Fundamentals and Sample Preparation
  • Part 2: Efficient and Effective Method Development
  • Part 3: Tips for Data Reduction and Presentation

Part 1: Instrument Fundamentals and Sample Preparation

IN THIS SESSION

This introductory session will introduce fundamental concepts of rheology and provide specific guidance for preparing the sample and instrument.

  • Rheology Fundamentals: viscosity, modulus, stress, strain, viscoelasticity
  • How a Rheometer Works
  • Appropriate Geometry Selection
  • Understanding Your Material and Preparing a Representative Sample

Part 2: Efficient and Effective Method Development

IN THIS SESSION

The basic experimental types in rheology are generally grouped into three categories: flow, oscillation, and transient tests. Each basic test group is introduced along with specific information to be gained from each test type and guidelines for appropriate experimental design. Emphasis is also paid to the complimentary nature of the test types, and how one might be used to extend the range of information obtained from another.

  • Flow
    • Steady state flow
    • Yield stress measurements
    • Thixotropy
  • Oscillation (Dynamic)
    • Oscillatory Testing: introduction and descriptions
    • Linear Viscoelasticity: definition and motivation
    • General approach to selecting appropriate test parameters
    • Time-dependence
    • Rate-dependence
    • Temperature-dependence and a brief introduction to TTS
  • Transient: Creep and Stress Relaxation

Part 3: Tips for Data Reduction and Presentation

IN THIS SESSION

As with any analytical technique, rheological data should be inspected carefully to avoid misinterpretation. Extreme experimental conditions can lead to errors. Strategies are introduced to show when such errors may be present, how the data can be used to show this, and how to mitigate the undesirable condition.

  • Instrument Inertia
  • Resonance
  • Axial Force
  • Waveform inspection
  • Wall Slip
  • Edge Fracture